“The Lucknow Cookbook” by Chand Sur and Sunita Kohli

I love history, I love food. With this as the background, it’s a no brainer that I loved, ” The Lucknow Cookbook” by the mother and daughter team of Chand Sur and Padma Shri Sunita Kohli, the famous interior decorator. This book of 225 pages, each one worth reading carefully has been published by Aleph in 2017. As specified in the title the book is centred around the city of Lucknow in the state of Uttar Pradesh in North India.

Lucknow, the capital of the Nawabs of Oudh, has had a special place in Indian history. It is renowned for its culture and customs. In more senses than one, it is the cultural capital of North India. No one who has visited there can come away without carrying memories of a Nawabi culture which sounds almost quaint now in the hustle and bustle of 21st century India. It is in this setting that Sunita Kohli shares family recipes handed down to her by her mother Chand Sur and other family members, friends and relatives. Chand first came to Lucknow in 1948 as a young bride from Quetta, in the days following the tumultuous Partition of British India into India and Pakistan.

Though the story of Chand Sur covers a  mere 20 odd pages, they are full of life and evoke fond memories of a period long gone by.  Continue reading ““The Lucknow Cookbook” by Chand Sur and Sunita Kohli”

Advertisements

“Happiness Is All We Want” by Ashutosh Mishra

Recently, I was delighted to read ” Happiness Is All I Want” by Ashutosh Mishra, a 200-page book published by Bloomsbury in 2016. Mishra is a B. Tech from IIT Delhi and an MBA from XLRI Jamshedpur. He has spent more than one and a half decades in the banking industry. He has worked with international organisations such as Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank and is currently a senior banker in ANZ Bank.  Mishra is therefore well-qualified to understand the stresses and strains of modern-day corporate life where executives are expected to be accessible almost on a 24×7 basis.  Continue reading ““Happiness Is All We Want” by Ashutosh Mishra”

“No Mud, No Lotus” by Thich Nhat Hanh

Often a catchy title of a book makes you want to read it all the more. One such book is, “No Mud, No Lotus” by Thich Nhat Hanh, who is reckoned to be one of the best Zen Buddhist teachers in the world. This slim book, just 109 pages in all, was published by Aleph Book Company in 2017. As a reader we figure out what the title of the book suggests and this is borne out by the book’s byline, ” The Art of Transforming Suffering.” At the outset, writes Hanh, “Most people are afraid of suffering. But suffering is a kind of mud, to help the lotus flower of happiness to grow. There can be no lotus flower without the mud.”

Continue reading ““No Mud, No Lotus” by Thich Nhat Hanh”

“The Indigo Sun” by Rupa Bhullar

I found “Indigo Sun” by Rupa Bhullar to be, like the curate’s egg in the famous phrase,  “good in parts.” It captured effectively the smells and sounds of Rajasthan and gave you an in-depth account of life there, but the story was slow off the blocks. Also, I could not reconcile myself as a reader to what I felt were some glaring anomalies. The character of Maya was well sketched and totally believable. But that little fellow Ananda, the son of a watchman in a hotel! How on earth did he get so much wisdom from being an uneducated boy. I could not believe that someone like him could hold forth on so many subjects under the sun. I found those parts quite boring.  Continue reading ““The Indigo Sun” by Rupa Bhullar”