Survey on Historical Fiction

Thanks to my long-standing interest in historical fiction I connected with the author, MK Tod. I follow Mary’s tweets @MKTodAuthor and she pointed me to a very interesting survey she has been conducting which seeks to find out what makes historical fiction buffs love this genre. You will find a lot of information on this in her blog A Writer of History. Continue reading “Survey on Historical Fiction”

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Alternate History

There is huge excitement in the air for many of us writers as November fast approaches. I have successfully completed NaNoWriMo for four consecutive years, from 2009 to 2012 and am very keen to make it 5 in 5 by successfully completing a NaNo novel in November 2013 too. This involves writing 50,000 words of a novel during the calendar month of November. The novel can be in any literary genre. Continue reading “Alternate History”

The Kennedy Imperative: Leon Berger

Being an avid fan of both historical fiction and John F. Kennedy, I immediately reached out for Leon Berger’s “The Kennedy Imperative.” I find that this is the first of The Kennedy Trilogy and was published in September 2013 by Premier Digital Publishing. The other two are scheduled to be published later this year.

Continue reading “The Kennedy Imperative: Leon Berger”

Authors I Admired: Cornelius Ryan

A couple of weeks ago, when I read the date on my newspaper I remembered that on June 6, 1944, the first of the Allied troops had landed on the beachhead at Normandy. This was a date no Second World War buff, like me, could ever forget.

Only today, I came across these awesome hitherto unpublished pictures taken by “Life” photographer, Frank Scherschel in an article in The Daily Mail.  Memories are funny things. One thing leads to another and my mind was soon flooded by memories of that classic movie, “The Longest Day”. Continue reading “Authors I Admired: Cornelius Ryan”

Snapshot

When Colonel Belliappa, Indian Army (Retd), a highly decorated war hero is found dying one night frothing at the mouth in anguish, there is no one else at home. Other than his immediate family. His wife, his daughter and his son.  Did he – who killed so many -kill himself or was he killed?
His death sets the clock back to his life as a career officer in the Indian Army. He fights with great valor in the 1971 war against Pakistan which leaves him physically and psychologically scarred for life. His aggression, maniacal bravery and being dispensable leads to a secret assignment. Being handpicked to command a crack team of Indian Army snipers as an irregular force to fight intruders and militants in the Kashmir Valley in 1989 . Years later, he is now a successful armaments dealer.
In the last months before his death, the Colonel finds himself in a series of conflicts with his family. Standing to gain from his death, unknown to each other, they plan to kill him separately. Does the Colonel pay the ultimate price for the spiral of vengeance he himself triggered some decades ago?