” Glimpses of a Glorious Past”: An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale: Book 2, 1908-1958

On June 10, 2017, I had shared the links to Book 1 of  “Glimpses of a Glorious Past: An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale” which resides in the website of the Old Lawrencians Association (Lovedale). In that post, I have explained in detail about this book project and how happy we the contributors were that it was supported by the Old Lawrencians Association. The book was formally released at Lovedale during the Annual General Body Meeting of the OLA during Founder’s on May 22, 2017. Book 1, for those of you who have not yet read it, covers the period from 1858 to 1908.

 

 

I am delighted to inform you that Book 2 of ” Glimpses….” which covers the second fifty years from 1908 to 1958 has recently been uploaded to the website of the OLA.  Here is the link for you to read Book 2 of ” Glimpses of a Glorious Past: An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale”.

As you can imagine the second fifty years were of crucial importance in the history of the School. I have captured the essence of Book 2 in this blog post of July 12, 2017 titled, ” About Book 2 of Glimpses….”.

Happy reading and send us your comments and feedback. Thank you!

 

 

 

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About Book 2 of “Glimpses of a Glorious Past” : An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale

On June 10, 2017,  I had posted links to Book 1 of “Glimpses of a Glorious Past: An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale.” This covered the period of the first 50 years of The Lawrence School, Lovedale from 1858 to 1908. As is commonly known, the School was named after Major General Sir Henry Lawrence KCB (1806-1857) who initiated the idea of providing schooling for the children of British soldiers in India, a large number of whom were orphans. He made the first financial contributions and helped raise funds for this purpose. He and his wife Honoria had the satisfaction of seeing their dream come true with the establishment of the Lawrence Asylum at Sanawar in 1847. This is now known as the The Lawrence School, Sanawar. Some years later, in 1855 this was followed by the Lawrence Asylum at Mount Abu in Rajasthan. In the memory of Sir Henry, the main subject of our book which is the institution started as the Ootacamund Lawrence Asylum, was established in 1858. Continue reading “About Book 2 of “Glimpses of a Glorious Past” : An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale”

“Glimpses of a Glorious Past” : An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale

I am delighted to say that a book project in which I was fairly immersed for a year or more has finally been launched successfully. “Glimpses of A Glorious Past: An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale” has found a home in the website of the Old Lawrencians Association (OLA). It was formally released on May 22, 2017 at the AGM of the OLA by its President, Mrs. Rukhmini Reddy Krishnan, (Class of ’61).

The School, founded in 1858, is now over 150 years old. We therefore decided to break the informal history into three parts of fifty years each. Book 1 covers our Founder, Major-General Sir Henry Lawrence, KCB and the formative years of the school. It describes the first 50 years of this institution in the Victorian era of the British Raj.  Here is the link for you to read Book 1 online wherever you are and whenever you wish to do so.

 

The Lawrence School, Lovedale ( Estd 1858)

Continue reading ““Glimpses of a Glorious Past” : An Informal History of The Lawrence School, Lovedale”

Death, Be Not Proud!

When we were in school, I remember studying the famous sonnet, “Death Be Not Proud” by the English poet, John Donne (1572-1631) . I must have been around 13 or 14 then and this poem made a big impact at an impressionable age. The first lines remain etched in my mind though over 50 years have flown by since I first came across them. “Death, be not proud though some have called you Mighty and Dreadful, for thou art not so…” Donne mocks death and says it is not something to be feared as it happens to everyone. He concludes by personifying Death, predicting that one day Death too shall die! ” Death shall be no more. Death, thou shall die.” Continue reading “Death, Be Not Proud!”